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Posts: 17 | Thanked: 0 times | Joined on Jan 2007
#21
i completely agree with the main points of the article.

but to be honest, i don't really care if nokia wakes up in time.
 
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#22
The N800 was exactly the right device for me; the device I had been waiting decades for.

I have many desires for a new device to replace my tablet, but the problem is simple, and it isn't Nokia's problem -- the Internet isn't ubiquitous yet. When we can get wifi-speed Internet anywhere I can use a mobile phone, and I can get it for a flat monthly rate that compares to cable/DSL prices, then the stage will be set for The Revolution. And it won't be phones leading the revolution, it will be devices like the tablets that can use all the Internet protocols (and open source software) to do the stuff that mobile phones do right now, as well as do all the stuff a laptop can do... and fit in your pocket when you're done...

So, maybe in 3-5 years, someone will make my next Dream Device. I'll have to upgrade before then, of course, because my tablet is so battered and worn that it probably won't hold out much longer, but I just don't see the infrastructure build-out happening fast enough to support anything that I would consider to be Revolutionary.
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Posts: 204 | Thanked: 15 times | Joined on Jan 2007 @ Berlin, Germany
#23
The N800 has strongly influenced my idea from the ultimate computational equipment that I would ALWAYS carry with me: an always/instant on, scratch resistant smartphone with 5" touch screen (and almost nothing around it), keyboard, camera, GPS and open source software. For me it is definitely not acceptable to have 2 or more devices in my pockets. I think many people are now used to carry their phone 16h/7d but would never give that privilege to one more device. Currently I have to care for my N800 as if it were a baby - where is it now, is it protected, do not forget it (:-)) etc.. That's too much stress!

Last edited by gammer; 2008-08-29 at 10:27.
 
Posts: 130 | Thanked: 13 times | Joined on Dec 2007
#24
If Nokia expected the Community to do it's work for it then I think they lost the plot. The community should be adding to the efforts of Nokia not instead of.

Failing that, a great deal more effort in providing everything required to encourage development by others.

I bought the N810 thinking it is an N series and so aimed at the consumer as well. As a perfect compliment to my N82. It has the potential to be that. The best people placed to deliver that is Nokia since they have the now how for both.

If it was not intended for the day to day user, it should not have been marketed as an N series device.

As it is, I find it ok. But it had (or has) the potential for so much more.

I think this sums it up nicely

http://tabletblog.com/2008/08/nokia-...c-nseries.html

At the end of the day, if this does not deliver, something else will come along. Just a shame to see some perfectly good hardware not used to it's potential.


Originally Posted by Texrat View Post
Don't assume that the past dictates the present or future... or that absence of evidence means evidence of absence.
Is that an indication that you see good things ahead (I hope so) or just like one of those disclaimers you get when you think of investing in some shares

Zuber

Last edited by Zuber; 2008-08-29 at 14:31.
 
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Posts: 861 | Thanked: 731 times | Joined on Jan 2008 @ Nomadic
#25
Originally Posted by Zuber View Post
If Nokia expected the Community to do it's work for it then I think they lost the plot. The community should be adding to the efforts of Nokia not instead of.

Failing that, a great deal more effort in providing everything required to encourage development by others.

I bought the N810 thinking it is an N series and so aimed at the consumer as well. As a perfect compliment to my N82. It has the potential to be that. The best people placed to deliver that is Nokia since they have the now how for both.

If it was not intended for the day to day user, it should not have been marketed as an N series device.

As it is, I find it ok. But it had (or has) the potential for so much more.

At the end of the day, if this does not deliver, something else will come along. Just a shame to see some perfectly good hardware not used to it's potential.

Is that an indication that you see good things ahead (I hope so) or juat like one of those disclaimers you get when you think of investing in some shares
Please don't take this as me hapring on you, I mean no ill will at all.

N-series devices are aimed at power users, not consumers, who are risk takers and primarly technology influencers. The numbered Nokia handsets and E-series devices are aimed at those with a more "it better just work when it comes out of the box" mindset.

The attribution of the N-series moniker to the ITs is therefore done in this wise. Yes, there is a huge failure of marketing and clear product orientation at play here, but as it has been said before - there is never been a device like the IT in terms of technology, scope, and culture. To call it an N-series was nearly as smart as calling the N93 one.

It has a ton of potential, just like anything else that gets into any human's hands. The question is what will you do with the potential (within your ability to do so), and what will happen as a result of looking at life through those lenses? To date, we've not see what the IT platform (not device, the platform - which includes the community, developers, UI folks, Maemo, Nokia, and marketing channels) is capable of. Its too new to know at this point.

@Zuber: your post I am quoting here actually addresses a bigger issue that Nokia will have as its moving towards a facilitator of innovation versus the harbringer of it - perceived branding/reputation versus enacted branding/perception. For those that know Nokia, they will expect the brand that was effective and met their need with an innovative solution that just worked. Nokia is pushing something different; and its not wrong, just different. Its very hard for this group of users to adjust to that change. But since we are those technology influcencers, this is what we do to drive innovation to the world around us.

I agree with you in this:
Just a shame to see some perfectly good hardware not used to it's potential.
It is; guess that I better get off my keyboard and start turning potential into realization
 

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Posts: 4,783 | Thanked: 1,252 times | Joined on Aug 2007 @ norway
#26
Originally Posted by anidel View Post
Speaking about the tablet as a phone, would it suffice to make it behave as a bluetooth headset of your bluetooth enabled phone ?
Now that we have Bluetooth 2.0 and A2DP (or ADP?) the bandwidth should suffice for both connections, shouldn't it ?

And as we are at it, why not sync the contacts with the Contacts app in the tablet.
And also improve the "Internet Call" module with a "Phone Call" option where I can either type the number to call or choose the contact to call and let the phone handle it while using the tablet as bluetooth headset (thus using its speakers or its headphones).

I think that would be more than enough to make everyone happy. Me at least.
The phone is another device, the phone is hidden in my jacket and has its own battery. I can bring only my phone with me and leave the tablet at home.
While browsing the web on my tablet (via the phone connection or WiFi) and recevie a call, I will be prompted to answer it ON THE TABLET.
Same for SMSes.

This already happens on the Mac if you have a good bluetooth phone, like my very old Ericsson t39m (the first bluetooth phone!).
Pairing it with the Mac and using the Addressbook application I was able to make/receive calls from the Mac, reading and sending SMSes THRU the Mac.

Why it can't be done on the tablet then ?
Also consider that MANY GPS Navigation devices already do it, like the linux based TomTom One.

So... what do you think ?
if your phone can export its whole addressbook as a vcard file then in theory it can already be done (i think i have a standing bug about importing vcard files with extended ascii characters or something like that, it makes the import error out).

what i would really love to see on the tablet tho is a syncml client/server. client so that it can sync with a online syncml server, and a server so that it can sync against any phone that supports syncml.

and make said syncml system extendable by third party so that one can use it to sync gpe and similar alongside the built in addressbook.

or maybe just bundle opensync?

beyond that, placing calls and sending sms from the tablet can be done via third party app. specifically, phonelink. reciving sms on the other hand...
 
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#27
Originally Posted by Zuber View Post
I think this sums it up nicely

http://tabletblog.com/2008/08/nokia-...c-nseries.html
sadly, that one is a bit to focused on the nokia n-series.

what i would love to see is generic enough stuff on the tablet side that anyone can implement something on the phone side to interface with it.
 
Posts: 130 | Thanked: 13 times | Joined on Dec 2007
#28
Originally Posted by tso View Post
sadly, that one is a bit to focused on the nokia n-series.

what i would love to see is generic enough stuff on the tablet side that anyone can implement something on the phone side to interface with it.
It's only an example (if only it was real). But I don't see any reason why Nokia could not do something for a wide range of their phones. I think most these days are based on a couple of standard platforms they use. i.e. S60, S40. Not sure about the other lower end ones.

Don't think it is realistic to expect them to provide and interface for other phones. Just the APIs to enable others to develop something if they choose.

I rather liked the idea of a remote desktop app for the phone that you can hook upto. No need for 2 addressbooks, calanders etc. I believe someone has done some VNC software for the S60/S40 platforms, but since it only worked over WiFi I did not look into it any further. Bluetooth would have been great.

Zuber

Last edited by Zuber; 2008-08-29 at 16:04.
 
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#29
Originally Posted by Zuber View Post
If Nokia expected the Community to do it's work for it then I think they lost the plot. The community should be adding to the efforts of Nokia not instead of.
*sigh*

It's very discouraging when people completely miss what's actually intended and has been going on, and then exaggerate like that. Not helpful for constructive dialog at all.
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Posts: 3,397 | Thanked: 1,209 times | Joined on Jul 2008 @ Netherlands
#30
A 1 GB limit on 3G is IMO a lot but it depends on what you'd use it for.

IMO the current wireless options in the NIT (WiFi & BT, eventually WiMAX) don't cut it for the mobility of the NIT I have in mind.

I wonder, those people who are against a 3G module on the NIT: do you already own a phone with 2/2.5/3G access which you're using? Besides the added price or that you wouldn't use it -- why are you against 3G on the NIT? One I can think of is the battery life, but an idle 3G chip uses about 40-70 mA.

For me, I hate mobile phones, and love SIP. I'd love to be able to use SIP for my phonecalls instead of a mobile phone. An on-board 3G chipset on the NIT would provide this, as well as (near) 24/7 e-mail via IMAP(S), and its useful for GPS as well (especially if you use Maemo Mapper but also for traffic information although a on-board radio would provide this too). It means I don't need to buy a phone with data plan just to use my NIT 24/7. It means I don't have to carry a phone around. It means I don't have to worry about the battery life of my phone.

PS: If one decides to clone Apple please don't clone their 3G functionality
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