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#81
I haven't really tried it myself, but my suspicion is that Debian chroot Gnome doesn't have access to the system configuration. Those things are managed by Maemo. What services do you want access to this way?
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#82
That was my first thought as well.. And also to make sure he's running it as root... but it would do you no good.. the Services in Gnome would be trying to mess with and access the /etc/init.d/ files inside Debian and have no relevance to the services being started in the Maemo Side. And the root in chroot may not have access to managing the processes started by root in Maemo.. Not sure on that one..

The Debian chroot doesn't start any Services per-say that aren't Gnome's itself so that configuration panel is really not relevant to the Easy Debian...

Though I could be overlooking something simple..
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#83
Thanks for your replies!
Actually I just wanted to access the Services panel of Gnome so that I can disable some of the services started at Gnome boot.. in an attempt to speed up its launch.

Right now Gnome takes quite some time to load completely (I'm starting gnome from Maemo, as per Qole), what I get is white screen, then black screen, then "X" cursor, then the Gnome top & bottom panels, then the Gnome menu & panel items appear (that part is fine, relatively fast), then it seems to hang, and after 1.5 or 2 minutes, the background appears, and some seconds after that, the desktop icons.

So yeah, I just wished I could prevent some services to launch in order to speed up the boot process.
 
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#84
Originally Posted by slick204 View Post
...I tried it but I'm getting endless Cannot open: no such file or directory....
That means partition failed. Redo partition until succeed.

bun
 
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#85
I should update this thread with a note about the new Easy Debian system...

You can speed up your copy by making the following changes to D'ohboy's instructions:

Originally Posted by D'ohboy View Post

We are assuming you are using (as in: installed and working) Qole's Debian image
I'll just update this with a link to the current image file.

http://qole.org/files/debian-squeeze-img.tar.bz2

Originally Posted by D'ohboy View Post
1 --------

First step: create a new partition/format your memory card.
(easiest way: mount your card on a linux box, use GParted to resize/create the new ext2 partition)

Put back the card in your device, boot it up.
You can also do this on-device using penguinbait's console tools or his gparted for the tablet.

Originally Posted by D'ohboy View Post
2 --------

Mount the current Debian image:

With this command (as root):
This has a better command now, too (much faster):

Code:
qmount /path/to/currentimgfile /debian
Originally Posted by D'ohboy View Post
Mount the new formatted partition:

Code:
mount /dev/mmcblkxxx /opt
4 --------

Copy the whole content of /debian to your freshly formatted partition.
In the present case:

Code:
cd /debian
/home/user/img-install/tar cf - . | (cd /opt/; tar xvf -)
5 --------

Restart device

6 --------

Edit /home/user/.chroot (as root: "vi /home/user/.chroot" ). Note that "IMGFILE=/dev/mmcblk1p1" needs to be modified to meet your needs (ie. replace "mmcblk1p1" to the ext2 partition you created)

# Sample config for chroot

# Device or image containing Debian filesystem.
# Default: first in /media/mmc[12]/debian*.img*
IMGFILE=/dev/mmcblk1p1

# Filesystem used; must always be set when using a partition.
# Default: from extension of IMGFILE, or ext2.
IMGFS=ext2

# Mount point for Debian.
# Default: /debian
CHROOT=/debian

# New /tmp dir size for printing / PDF creation
# Default: 2M
TMPSIZE=2M

# Debian user to drop privileges
# Default: user
DEBUSER=user

7 --------

You can remove the debian.img.ext2, as it's no longer needed)

8 --------

Tap on the "Debian chroot" menu item. If everything went well, you should see it mount the Debian image from: /dev/mmcblk1p1 (or whatever partition you have chosen)

I found that there was no need to edit the /sbin/debian only the chroot.
Everything else is fine!
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#86
Another quick update to these instructions for N900 users:

The /opt directory is used on the N900 for lots of system files now, so you need to use /floppy instead.

Also, the latest image file is debian-m5-v3d.img.ext2.lzma
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#87
Was reading this old thread trying to set up ED image, and stumbled on super easy way to create ED partition using KDE partition utility...(I was using Kubuntu):

-Download ED image and extract .ext2 file
-Hook up n900 in mass storage mode.
-Open partition utility and make unpartitioned space on SD card big enough for the image (about 2.1 GB)
-Open 'partition' menu and select "restore"
-Choose the ext2 file. Voila, the complete ED partition will be created!

Then just install ED Chroot, and change /home/user/.chroot to point to the partition. The line will look like "IMAGE=/dev/mmcblk1pX" where X is the partition number...ie 1 if it's the first partition on the SD card!
 

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#88
Originally Posted by nman View Post
Was reading this old thread trying to set up ED image, and stumbled on super easy way to create ED partition using KDE partition utility...(I was using Kubuntu):

-Download ED image and extract .ext2 file
-Hook up n900 in mass storage mode.
-Open partition utility and make unpartitioned space on SD card big enough for the image (about 2.1 GB)
-Open 'partition' menu and select "restore"
-Choose the ext2 file. Voila, the complete ED partition will be created!

Then just install ED Chroot, and change /home/user/.chroot to point to the partition. The line will look like "IMAGE=/dev/mmcblk1pX" where X is the partition number...ie 1 if it's the first partition on the SD card!
I've prepared an ext4 partition for extracting the debian .ex2 image - how do i do this on the n900 (how do you extract .ext2 file)?
 
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