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Posts: 224 | Thanked: 132 times | Joined on Jun 2012 @ Cairo ;Egypt
#11
Originally Posted by elros34 View Post
I'm tried do this long time ago but without succes. I guess we can't chrooting nemo images due to mismatch between the versions of glibc in nemo and maemo. You should ask qole for better info.
http://qole.blogspot.com/2010/11/run...chroot_06.html


you can use the deb file It is based on qole script

http://www.mediafire.com/?cx23ficm83lgfcu


Then renamed Nemo image to meego and run it. If it does not work You must conformation Nemo image Such as Next

http://qole.blogspot.com/2010/11/run...00-chroot.html
 
Posts: 3,296 | Thanked: 4,325 times | Joined on May 2011 @ Poland
#12
Originally Posted by amr.fayz View Post
you can use the deb file It is based on qole script

http://www.mediafire.com/?cx23ficm83lgfcu


Then renamed Nemo image to meego and run it. If it does not work You must conformation Nemo image Such as Next

http://qole.blogspot.com/2010/11/run...00-chroot.html
I'm using the old version of MeeGo Miro (still with tar.gz) and doesn't work.

When doing everything manually,

Code:
mount -t ext4 /path/to/img.ext4 /.nemo
chroot /home/nemo
The last command fails. qchroot does some nice tweaking, but it's essential to chroot the system alone...
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Posts: 224 | Thanked: 132 times | Joined on Jun 2012 @ Cairo ;Egypt
#13
What is the size of the img ؟ Possible be needy Sizing like backtrack 5

http://www.opendebug.com/article/466922

http://talk.maemo.org/showthread.php?t=72933

Last edited by amr.fayz; 2013-04-01 at 17:43.
 
Posts: 571 | Thanked: 980 times | Joined on Dec 2012
#14
amr.fayz, there is no problem with mount or scripts (details) but with chroot.
 
Posts: 224 | Thanked: 132 times | Joined on Jun 2012 @ Cairo ;Egypt
#15
Originally Posted by elros34 View Post
amr.fayz, there is no problem with mount or scripts (details) but with chroot.

What about extension ext4 the img Working the extension is ext3 & ext2 Is it possible to be the reason that ؟

http://www.robertocolistete.net/MaemoMeeGo/EasyDebian/
 
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#16
Originally Posted by amr.fayz View Post
What about extension ext4 the img Working the extension is ext3 & ext2 Is it possible to be the reason that ؟

http://www.robertocolistete.net/MaemoMeeGo/EasyDebian/
The problem is not with the image file, it mounts alright. I just cannot change the root directory (chroot) to the mount directory. Generally if bad suffix (ext*) is used, qchroot fails. it detects the fs type this way.
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#17
Originally Posted by amr.fayz View Post
What about extension ext4 the img Working the extension is ext3 & ext2 Is it possible to be the reason that ؟
I have my own debian armhf on ext4 partition so this is not the point, check this.
 
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#18
Originally Posted by elros34 View Post
I have my own debian armhf on ext4 partition so this is not the point, check this.
You are right

HTML Code:
ext3 to ext4 (or anything else)

A word of warning. The version of e2fsprogs in Maemo is ancient, and xfs-tools seems to be non-existent, so if you use ext4 or xfs, you will lose the ability to fsck the image on the device itself. This is fine if you have (and are happy to use) a Linux PC; if not then you may want to stick to ext2/ext3.

Migrating from ext3 to ext4 has no impact on existing files that were written under ext3, only on newly written files. Therefore, to achieve the expected benefit from a migration to ext4, you'll need to create a fresh image of the desired size, format it and copy the contents of your old image onto your new one. You'll probably want to do this over USB from a Linux PC rather than from the device itself, both for speed reasons and (probably) for newer versions of the applicable filesystem tools.

First, create a file of the desired size, either with dd or by simply making a copy of the image file that you intend to clone.

cp <image-name>.img.ext3 <image-name>.img.ext4

Now format the new image file with the desired file system. We'll use ext4 here, but this should work for any filesystem that is supported by kernel-power.

mkfs.ext4 /path/to/mounted/n900/<image-name>.img.ext4

You might want to consider the "-T small" option to mkfs, which will yield a smaller block size (1KB) and more inodes, otherwise you'll be limited to 262,144 files in 1,048,575 blocks, also, at your option "-m 0" to set the reserved blocks count to zero (do not keep 5% back for the superuser). Once that's done, we need to mount both images, and clone the old one to the new one:

mkdir /mnt/old
mkdir /mnt/new
mount -t ext3 -o loop /path/to/mounted/n900/<image-name>.img.ext3 /mnt/old
mount -t ext4 -o loop /path/to/mounted/n900/<image-name>.img.ext4 /mnt/new
cp -a /mnt/old/* /mnt/new/
umount /mnt/new
umount /mnt/old

It does no harm at this point to run a filesystem check on the newly created image. You'll also need to make sure that the image is either configured in .chroot or is the first such image in the directory in order for the Easy Debian chroot scripts to pick it up.
 

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